The State of Libraries of Historically Black Colleges and Universities

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    The State of Libraries at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
    (LYRASIS, 2011-04) Askew, Consuella ; Phoenix, Sandra
    This report examines a total of 193 academic libraries, 94 historically black college and university libraries (HBCUs), and 99 non-HBCUs, using data collected through the 2008 Academic Libraries Survey (ALS) conducted by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). The ALS data set also integrates data from the Integrated postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) pertaining to institutional characteristics. In this report, the following areas of library services and operations are reviewed: outlets and staff, expenditures, collections, technology, and library services and information literacy.
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    The State of Libraries at Historically Black Colleges and Universities
    (LYRASIS (formerly SOLINET), 2005-09) Idleman, Lynda ; Nyberg, Sandra
    How do the levels of support for and services from HBCU libraries compare to those at other academic institutions? To develop a baseline comparison, the HBCU Library Alliance and the Southeastern Library Network (SOLINET) undertook an assessment of the state of libraries at HBCUs using data collected by the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) through its biennial Academic Libraries Survey (ALS). Funded by the Training and Technical Assistance Program of the Library Statistics Program at the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science (NCLIS), The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and SOLINET, the assessment project is part of a broader initiative at the HBCU Library Alliance to strengthen HBCU libraries by integrating them into campus programs for teaching and learning. The information in this report can help HBCU libraries, individually and as a group, identify needs and priorities for strengthening library services and campus educational programs. It also provides documentation that can be used to examine and potentially influence public policy issues. In addition to this report, each of the HBCU libraries in the data set received a set of individualized tables comparing the statistics from its own survey response to the responses of peer groups.